How did I land a full stack developer job without a tech degree or work experience?

By | September 28, 2019

Six months ago, I got the first developer job as a stack web developer for startups. I had no relevant work experience, no tech degree, and didn’t even have a year of active coding experience. And yet I fulfilled my dream offer, and today I can say for the first time in my life that I love my job. Here’s how I did it – longer version.

Embracing the Fourth Life Crisis

About three years ago, I was in the middle of a fourth quarter-life crisis. I graduated from business school, got an investment banking job, and then within a few months realized that I hated everything about it.
Totally lost and to a great extent, I was alone in traveling for a few months to “find myself”. And even though I thought I did, I didn’t. Not enough anyway. But in fact, it helped me figure out a few things.
The first thing was that I couldn’t keep my financial resources easy. I could not see any future scene where I was happy.

The other thing was that backpacking and surfing, though great and everything, would not help me find the “calling” I was looking for. The only reasonable thing seemed to be the classic method of trial and error.
So when I returned home, I decided to try some things I thought could both please me and provide me with some decent living at the same time. And it was trial and error.

At first, I thought I’d write a serious shot. In the meantime, I have heard so much about life as a freelance life that I thought I would try it. So I set up my firm, and soon some of the business analysts’ projects stumbled. Being my own boss was certainly very exciting at first, and being able to work literally anywhere was brand new to me.

As anyone dealing with digital content will know, clickbait culture comes at the expense of creativity and quality. In other words, when the actual content of your content is clicked, all the top executives needed to find those clicks will soon eliminate any creative ambitions that existed in the first place. In addition, I could not shake the feeling that as a writer/editor, I was always far away from what I was reporting. So I left. Which was fine with me in my trial and error agreement. But still, I found it disgusting, because I had actually invested in the entire writing thing in eight months. But as smart as one may say or not to say: When one door closes, another door opens.
And I had one more thing left in the testing and error list.

Text that costs $ 6,000

I’m not sure I really know what my purpose is. What started me was the frustration of my recurring career frustrations. But how funny and enjoyable I have to be to tell that I found coding exercises.
I couldn’t even tell you that coding turned into a serious “I’m going to be a professional developer” dying from a casual project. But it was probably somewhere. When my next life-changing event happened, I was about to receive my Frontend Certificate from FreeCodeCamp.

After I quit my job as a business developer, I decided to move to Central America to escape the Swedish winter organs. I figured that if I were to spend hundreds of hours alone, teaching myself coding, I might as well be hot, cheap, and frustrated.
I was coding on my laptop at a hostel in El Salvador when I received a text from my friend Marie. He said, “I got a job!”
My code was also learning how to code. I remembered that she, a few months ago, had told me about this code school that she had gone. A “coding Bootcamp.”
At that time I basically made fun of him. Are you paying 5000p for a 12-week course? And you can’t get single university credit for that? And to do that, did you withdraw from your advanced MBA? Seems legitimate.
And yet she was there. Four months later, and Mary was officially hired as a junior back and developer at Accenture’s digital agency. I was really happy with it, but it was also very respectful.

Lunch changed my life

Life is weird, and sometimes it hides the biggest, ever-changing directions of life in places you don’t expect. It was definitely for me when I experienced my first “pull” toward coding.
Although quitting a job in the magazine felt like a failure, this experience would not be in the best sense. After writing a lot about tech startups and the exciting life of entrepreneurs, I also died giving this lifestyle a shot.

And after about a month of research and job hunting, I managed to land at one of the most promising art tech companies in the Nordics – at the time. In just a few years, it joined Europe’s largest equity crowdfunding platform.
I did not really apply at the beginning of any particular work. But since I really believed in the mission of the company, and was impressed with their success, I was just telling their CFO to contact them. We met several times, and suddenly I was working on some fuzzy business development role there.

I did not really apply at the beginning of any particular work. But since I really believed in the mission of the company, and was impressed with their success, I was just telling their CFO to contact them. We met several times, and suddenly I was working on some fuzzy business development role there.
Although I expect to work on strategic and analytics projects, I ended up doing what fuzzy business developers usually do: sales. That was the reason why the work was not fruitful in the end. Just like the magazine’s last job experience, this job will prove that it has not worked at all. In fact, without it, I probably wouldn’t be a developer today. Because that’s where I met Sandra.
She was the front end developer on the product team, sitting at the other end of the small support office at the time we were tired.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *